Between 2004 and 2009 I traveled to different parts of the planet to photograph the way of life of the last communities of artisanal fishermen. Communities that depend almost exclusively on the sea and that are suffering from the depletion of the same either by overexploitation or by pollution.

According to FAO data, in the middle of the 20th century, 18 million tons of fish were caught per year, today more than 100 million are caught. Modern fishing is dominated by industrialized fishing vessels (more than four million) that are well above the capacity of the oceans to restore the amount of fish caught. Gigantic vessels that use the latest available technology for locating fish are able to find schools of fish quickly and efficiently.

However, artisanal fishing manages an ancestral culture that includes a great knowledge of the ecosystem, the result of observation and transmission of traditional knowledge, and respect for it, managing annual catches of fish to promote sustainable development of the community without depleting its natural resources.

Children of the Ocean is a tribute to all those artisanal fishermen whose life revolves around the sea and from which they obtain everything necessary for their survival, but the work also has the pretension of being a wake-up call and of social awareness in favor of the preservation of marine ecosystems.

Javier Teniente

 

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